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Basket

Workshop of Paul de Lamerie, English (born Netherlands), 1688 - 1751

Geography:
Made in London, England, Europe

Date:
1743-1744

Medium:
Silver

Dimensions:
10 1/2 x 14 x 10 3/4 inches (26.7 x 35.6 x 27.3 cm)

Curatorial Department:
European Decorative Arts and Sculpture

Object Location:

* Gallery 281, European Art 1500-1850, second floor

Accession Number:
1959-151-6

Credit Line:
Gift of Mrs. Widener Dixon and George D. Widener, 1959

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Label:
Paul de Lamerie's workshop produced a number of basket designs between 1724 and 1751. Several of the decorative elements seen on this basket, including the mermaid handle and dolphin supports, were derived from sixteenth- and seventeenth-century examples. Its shape and design proved very popular, and were copied by other English silversmiths both before and after Lamerie's death.

Additional information:
  • PublicationPhiladelphia Museum of Art: Handbook of the Collections

    Silver baskets such as this for holding cake or bread were first made in the sixteenth century. They were given their most imaginative treatment in the eighteenth century by silversmiths such as Paul de Lamerie, head of one of the most celebrated English silver workshops of the day, which produced numerous baskets of various shapes between 1724 and 1751. This example belongs to a group of silver objects, bearing Lamerie's mark and dating from about 1737 to about 1745, that are boldly sculptural in style and that may be the work of an unidentified modeler working for Lamerie, perhaps continental in origin. Several of the decorative elements on this basket, including the scallop-shell shape, mermaid handle, and dolphin supports, were derived from sixteenth- and seventeenth-century silver. The form of this basket proved very popular, and was copied by other English silversmiths both before and after Lamerie's death. Donna Corbin, from Philadelphia Museum of Art: Handbook of the Collections (1995), p. 139.

* Works in the collection are moved off view for many different reasons. Although gallery locations on the website are updated regularly, there is no guarantee that this object will be on display on the day of your visit.

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