Fruit Cluster

Artist/maker unknown, Dutch

Geography:
Made in Delft, Netherlands, Europe

Date:
c. 1750

Medium:
Tin-glazed earthenware with polychrome decoration

Dimensions:
4 1/2 x 4 15/16 x 1 15/16 inches (11.4 x 12.5 x 4.9 cm)

Curatorial Department:
European Decorative Arts and Sculpture

Object Location:

Currently not on view

Accession Number:
1966-210-1

Credit Line:
Purchased with the Edgar Viguers Seeler Fund, 1966

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Label:
This fruit cluster consists of two apples and three green leaves executed in deep relief. Many Delft fruit clusters and garlands were fashioned after ornamental woodcarvings on seventeenth-century Dutch wooden cupboards. A wide variety of these pieces survive today, including apples, pears, chestnuts, figs, grapes, and prunes.

Additional information:
  • PublicationDelft Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

    This fruit cluster consists of two apples and three green leaves executed in deep relief. The fruit and stems are naturalistically modeled in the round. Between the two stems is a little hole for hanging. This hole is glazed, showing that it was made by the potter and not added later. The fruit is decorated in yellow, green, purple, and brown on a white background.

    Faience fruit clusters and garlands made in Delft were modeled after ornamental woodcarvings on seventeenth-century Dutch wooden cupboards. These Delft garlands typically consist of an assortment of fruit such as pears, apples, quinces, and bunches of grapes. In Faïences hollandaises, XVIIe-XVIIIe--début XIXe siècle, Jean Helbig mentions that the Musées Royaux d'Art et d'Histoire in Brussels have ten polychrome garlands of apples of different sizes.1 A specifically Dutch phenomenon, these self-contained fruit sculptures do not form part of a larger picture and are not found, for example, in the fifteenth-century Italian faience of Luca della Robbia nor in maiolica from other countries. Ella B. Schaap, from Delft Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (2003), p. 62.

    1. Helbig, Jean. Faïences hollandaises, XVIIe-XVIIIe-- début XIXe siècle. Brussels: Musées Royaux D'Art et d'Histoire, n.d., p. 70, fig. 57.