Woman's '"Flying Saucer" Dress

Designed by Issey Miyake, Japanese, born 1938

Geography:
Made in Japan, Asia

Date:
Spring/Summer 1994

Medium:
Heat-set polyester plain weave

Dimensions:
Height (Pink Band): 7 1/2 inches (19.1 cm)

Curatorial Department:
Costume and Textiles

Object Location:

Currently not on view

Accession Number:
1997-100-1

Credit Line:
Gift of Issey Miyake, 1997

Social Tags [?]

There are currently no user tags associated with this object.


[Add Your Own Tags]

Label:
Issey Miyake transcends both his Japanese heritage and his training in Western couture to redefine the concept of clothing and reinvent the activity of wearing clothes. His "Flying Saucer" dress pays homage to American sculptor Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988), who was the designer's hero, close friend, and mentor. Miyake credits Noguchi with teaching him everything he knows about space and proportion. Like Noguchi's Akari light sculptures, Miyake's tubular dress looks more fragile than it is. While the dress becomes an extension of the wearer, taking its shape from the body beneath, its eccentric silhouette is due to the nature of the permanently pleated polyester fabric and the seamed construction of the garment. The dress, which simply pulls on, returns to its preset shape after wearing and washing, and is easily stored in its collapsed, accordion-pleated form.

Additional information:
  • PublicationBest Dressed: Fashion from the Birth of Couture to Today

    Issey Miyake transcends both his Japanese heritage and his training in Western couture to redefine the concept of clothing and reinvent the activity of wearing clothes. With the "Flying Saucer" dress of 1994, he shows how modern clothes can be high-tech as well as fun, uniting the advanced technology of permanently pleated polyester with the traditional form of paper lanterns sold at Japanese fairs. While the dress becomes an extension of the wearer, taking its shape from the body beneath, its eccentric silhouette is due to the nature of the fabric and the seamed construction of the garment. The dress, which simply pulls on, returns to its preset shape after wearing and washing, and is easily stored in its collapsed, accordion-pleated form. Yet this same dress is also ever changing; its shape reacts to movement, and both the creases of the fabric and the deeper structural peaks and indentations catch every play of light, creating an energetic and exuberant mood that is reiterated in its festive bands of color. Dilys E. Blum and H. Kristina Haugland, from Best Dressed: Fashion from the Birth of Couture to Today (1997) pp. 70-71.