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Curriculum Connections

Hydrangeas Spring Song
Hydrangeas Spring Song, 1976
Alma Thomas, American
Acrylic on canvas
78 x 48 inches (198.1 x 121.9 cm)
125th Anniversary Acquisition. Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Julius Rosenwald II in honor of René and Sarah Carr d'Harnoncourt, The Judith Rothschild Foundation, and with other funds being raised in honor of the 125th Anniversary of the Museum and in celebration of African American art, 2002
2002-20-1
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Language Arts/English
Elementary School
Which letters of the alphabet can you find (capital letters: C, T, X, L, N, E, V, F, P, I, Z, J; lowercase letters: t, i)? Make a list of ten adjectives that describe how this painting looks or feels. (If some of the words are negative, ask students to think of one positive word as well.)

Middle School
Imagine that the shapes and letters in this painting form a secret code. Write a story that includes someone cracking the code in order to solve a crime or a mystery or to prevent a disaster.

High School
Compare haiku poetry with this painting. Write haiku poems, choosing one season, one color, and one plant as the key elements.

Social Studies
All Levels
Compare the work of Alma Thomas and Elizabeth Catlett (see Sharecropper). Debate their opposing views of the purpose of art: to create beauty versus to promote social justice.

Math
Elementary School
Cut photocopies of this painting into four, six, or eight rectangles of the same size. Divide students into groups. Give one set of rectangles to each group, with one rectangle for each student. After each student counts the shapes in their rectangle, the group adds them together, comparing their total with those of other groups.

Middle School
Make photocopies of the painting and cut them into four, six, or eight rectangles. Number each rectangle, then figure out the shape density of each one. Make a bar graph showing the relative densities of each section.

High School
Using photocopies of the painting, create a geometric shape with an area of four square inches that has the maximum possible density of blue shapes inside it.

Art
Elementary School
Examine plants and flowers and identify abstract shapes in them. Using one color of paint and a medium-size brush, make a collection of similar abstract shapes on a large piece of white paper.

Middle School
Look in magazines and cut out squares of a variety of blues, yellows, and reds. Discuss the ways different blues, yellows, and reds make you feel and what they remind you of. Make a collage using different abstract shapes of a single color.

High School
Using acrylic paint, create abstract works based on the play of sunlight and shadows on flowers or leaves.
 

For more information, please contact The Division of Education by phone at (215) 684-7580, by fax at (215) 236-4063, or by e-mail at .

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