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November 8th, 2010
Celebrating Opposites at the Every Family Party November 13, 2010

Inspired by the publication of Art Museum Opposites, a new picture book published by the Museum’s Education department, families are invited to explore the theme of opposites all over the Museum with music, dance and art-making activities at the Every Family Party on November 13, 2010.

Family-friendly activities, music, dancing, food and performances will take place from 5:30 – 8 p.m. at the Museum’s Main Building. Single tickets are $30 ($25 per person for a group of four or more), and community tickets are available for $25. All community tickets purchased enable children and families from the Museum’s community group partners to attend this annual event. Proceeds from the Every Family Party benefit the Museum’s Division of Education. Children age 1 and under are free. Call (215) 235-SHOW to purchase tickets.The Every Family Party is presented by PNC Arts Alive, which is a 5-year, $5 million grant initiative of the PNC Foundation that supports innovative arts programming that engages audiences in new ways.

The opposites theme will be explored through various art-making activities taking place on the first and second floors of the Museum, beginning with a community art project in the Great Stair Hall. Guided by themes of weather in the Impressionist galleries, including Vincent van Gogh’s painting Rain, children are invited to create stained-glass windows in Gallery 152, then travel to nearby Gallery 161 to explore themes of “many and few.” Ellsworth Kelly’s predominantly black and white works guide the activities taking place in Gallery 175, where, inspired by his monochromatic artistic vision, children are invited to use various materials to create collages. In Gallery 181, visitors can make flashlight covers to explore themes of light and dark, and can imagine the way light might have changed an artist’s choice of colors or materials. Additional first-floor activities include a quiet space for reading picture books in the Verizon-sponsored Peace and Quiet Reading Room (Gallery 186) and dancing and singing in Gallery 176 with the internationally recognized early childhood music program Music Together. All children are invited to participate in the musical activities, which will continue throughout the evening.

Activities and art-making stations in the second-floor galleries include fun house mirrors exploring themes of “wide and narrow” on the Great Stair Hall balcony, gold diptych (two-sided) picture frames inspired by a gilded altarpiece in Gallery 255, and an “old and new” art-making activity based on the Museum’s nearby period rooms. In Gallery 266, surrounded by sculptures by an unknown artist depicting spring, summer, fall and winter, children are invited to discuss the difference between “real and make-believe” as they interact with a pair of storytellers from Creative Juice Group.

The Every Family Party will conclude with a finale performance by the Pennsylvania Ballet II, performers from America’s Got Talent, and a local hip-hop dance group.

The Museum’s second children’s book produced by the Museum’s education department, Art Museum Opposites is supported by Marie-Louise Jackson, and is both a guide to the evening’s theme and an invitation for children to use their imaginations to look more closely at the world around them. Themes encouraging “Love Difference”—repeated in the exhibitions Michelangelo Pistoletto: From One to Many, 1956-1974 and Cittadellarte—will also be explored as children discover the qualities that make two seemingly different objects both opposite and complementary.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Its facilities include its landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. The Museum offers a wide variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.

For additional information, contact the Communications Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art phone at 215-684-7860, by fax at 215-235-0050, or by e-mail at pressroom@philamuseum.org. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is located on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street. For general information, call (215) 763-8100.

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