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September 15th, 2011
Philadelphia Museum of Art Appoints Hiromi Kinoshita Associate Curator of Chinese Art

Philadelphia, PA (September 15, 2011)—Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, today announced the appointment of Hiromi Kinoshita as Associate Curator of Chinese Art in the Department of East Asian Art. Currently Assistant Curator of Chinese Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Dr. Kinoshita will join the staff on April 1, 2012. She will be responsible for the care and utilization of the Museum’s extensive holdings of Chinese art.

“Hiromi Kinoshita brings great promise to the stewardship of a significant part of our collection at an important moment in the history of this institution,” said Rub.  “This position has recently been endowed by an anonymous donor whose gift was matched by a grant from the Chairman Emeritus of our Board of Trustees, Gerry Lenfest, and his wife, Marguerite. We are grateful to these individuals for their generosity and for the opportunity this gives us to focus—through reinstallation, research, and programming—on an area that needs more attention. In Dr. Kinoshita, we have found an individual with significant curatorial experience and a broad knowledge of the field whose skills perfectly match our needs. With this appointment also comes the opportunity also to broaden the Museum’s outreach to diverse communities in the city and region, especially Philadelphia’s large and vibrant Chinese community.”

Prior to her current position at the Museum of Fine Arts, Dr. Kinoshita served as consulting curator at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for The First Emperor: China’s Terracotta Army (2008-09), an exhibition that originated in London at the British Museum where Dr. Kinoshita had served as Assistant Curator (2006-2008) and authored the essay, Qin Palaces and Architecture, for the catalogue. Before her service at the British Museum, she was co-curator at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, of the Qing exhibition China: The Three Emperors (1662-1795) and catalogue contributor. Earlier in her career Dr. Kinoshita served as a research assistant for Professor Michael Sullivan at Oxford and as Gallery Manager for J. J. Lally & Co. Oriental Art in New York.

Dr. Kinoshita will become a member of the Museum’s Department of East Asian Art under the leadership of Dr. Felice Fischer, The Luther W. Brady Curator of Japanese Art and Senior Curator of East Asian Art. “I am delighted that we have found in Hiromi a distinguished scholar who will bring energy, creativity and insight to our remarkable holdings in this field,” said Dr. Fischer.

Commented Dr. Kinoshita, “I am excited to come to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and look forward to researching the collection, re-installing the galleries and making the collection more accessible through new programs. I am also impressed with the spirit of the staff, the donors, and what the community of Philadelphia means to the Museum.”

Dr. Kinoshita was born in Hong Kong to a Chinese mother and a Japanese-Canadian father. She received her BA degree from Wellesley College (1992) with a dual concentration in Art History and Chinese, a postgraduate diploma in Asian art at Sotheby’s Institute at the University of London (1992), and earned her PhD in Chinese Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford (2006). Her dissertation was on the hybrid burial practices of the Liao Khitan elite (907–1125).

About the Chinese Art collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art
Among the most important in the country, the Museum's holdings of the arts of China were first displayed in 1877 when the Museum opened its doors at Memorial Hall, the former Fine Arts Gallery for the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. The collection today encompasses more than 12,000 works, and is distinguished in its exceptional ceramics, with major strengths in funerary sculpture of the Tang Dynasty (618–906 CE), and imperial porcelains of the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) Dynasties. It is also remarkable for a group of distinctive architectural interiors that include a Ming period reception hall from Beijing with painted floral and animal motifs on its ceiling members, and an 18th-century scholar's study, also from that city. Among the collection's popular favorites are the hardwood furniture from the Ming dynasty, a strikingly elaborate cloisonné dog cage from the period of the Qianlong Emperor (r. 1736–95) and a beguiling rock crystal moon incised with a poem by the Emperor.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Its facilities include its landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. The Museum offers a wide variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.

For additional information, contact the Marketing and Communications Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art at (215) 684-7860. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is located on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street. For general information, call (215) 763-8100, or visit the Museum's website at www.philamuseum.org.

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