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For a comprehensive, illustrated checklist of all of the paintings in the Philadelphia Museum of Art (complete as of June 30, 1992), see Paintings from Europe and the Americas in the Philadelphia Museum of Art: A Concise Catalogue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art 1994. This may be purchased directly from the Museum Store.

Related Sites:


  • American Association of Museums
    Guidelines concerning the Unlawful Appropriation of Objects During the Nazi Era
    http://www.aam-us.org/museumresources/ethics/nazi_guidelines.cfm
  • American Association of Art Museum Directors
    AAMD Task Force on the Spoliation of Art
    http://www.aamd.org/papers/guideln.php
  • Nazi-Era Provenance Internet Portal
    The Portal provides a searchable registry of objects in U.S. museum collections that changed hands in Continental Europe during the Nazi era (1933-1945)
    http://www.nepip.org
  • Presidential Commission on Holocaust Assets in the US
    http://www.pcha.gov
  • Project for the Documentation of Wartime Losses
    Many of the individual dealers who were known to have collaborated with the Nazis on the seizure and subsequent dispersal of works of art during the years leading up to the war and through its aftermath are listed at http://docproj.loyola.edu.
  • The Art Trade under the Nazis
    The Art Newspaper's online version of the same list is searchable by country, city and name.
    http://www.theartnewspaper.com/
  • US National Archives and Records Administration
    Captured German records, now at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland, provide a significant resource for tracing the confiscation and subsequent dispersal of paintings seized by the Nazis. Many of the paintings confiscated in this manner were discovered in salt mines in southern Germany and Austria by the Allies in the last days of the war, and were removed to the Munich Central Collecting Point. Records from the Munich Central Collecting Point document the restitution of the paintings to their countries of origin, where prewar owners or heirs claimed them.

Related Publications:


  • Stephanie Barron, ed. "Degenerate Art": The Fate of the Avant-Garde in Nazi Germany. Los Angeles, 1991
  • Richard Dorment. British Painting in the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia, 1986
  • Hector Feliciano. The Lost Museum. New York, 1997
  • Michael Kurtz. Nazi Contraband: American Policy on the Return of European Cultural Treasures, 1945-1955. New York, 1985
  • Lynn H. Nicholas. The Rape of Europa. New York, 1994
  • Jonathan Petropoulos. Art as Politics in the Third Reich. University of North Carolina Press, 1996
  • Jonathan Petropoulos. The Faustian Bargain: The Art World in Nazi Germany. New York, 2000
  • Elizabeth Simpson, ed. The Spoils of War: World War II and Its Aftermath. The Loss, Reappearance, and Recovery of Cultural Property. New York, 1997
  • Peter C. Sutton. Northern European Paintings in the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia, 1990
  • Nancy H. Yeide, Konstantin Akinsha and Amy Walsh. The AAM Guide to Provenance Research. Washington, D.C., 2001

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