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Visiting an exhibition in person is a much richer experience than visiting online.

The general public saw Cubist artworks for the first time at that annual exhibition in Paris, what are your reactions to these paintings and sculpture nearly a century later? What was your favorite gallery in the exhibition and why? Which works of art impressed you the most and the least?

best art i have seen and i am 9

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Maura - 4.1.2010 - 3:00 PM
I WAS MORE INTERESTED IN THE OTHER ARTIST'S WORK, MOSTLY WORK IN YOUR OTHER COLLECTIONS THAT IS IN THE MUSEUMS STOREROOMS THAT ONE NEVER GETS TO SEE THINGS THAT I SAW YEARS AND YEARS AGO THAT ARE 'FORGOTTEN ABOUT NOW WHAT I REALLY WANT IS A SHOW TITLED AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN ART FROM THE 40's to the 90's. i miss those guys. thanks

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tom - 4.1.2010 - 2:42 PM
visually stimulating, understandably shaping of the novice viewer. It is an exhibit that illustrates the progression and industrialization of the Cubist and progressive art movement. It also illustrated to me how much goes into the interpretation of a painting. Understandably, we live in an age where there are always two sides to every story, but we also have to be careful not to read too much into the details of a painting or a sculpture, and thus interpreting what it is what we want to see. For myself, I found it aesthetically pleasing to see such illustrious pieces of art on display for the public, but it also showed me that art is interpretation at its base form. It's painfully obvious to say that, but I feel that many people lose track of that fact, especially art critics. Passion can only go so far. I still enjoyed it, so don't worry PMOA!

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figureouTThecontext - 4.1.2010 - 2:16 PM
It was...interesting. Last week I watched a PBS special on Pablo Picasso and I was surprised how little information was given in this exhibition. I was glad to have already had more knowledge of Picasso from the TV special. I like the "Nude Descending the Staircase" or whatever the title was. That wasn't in the pbs special and I liked the information form the headset thingy. I was glad to have attended this exhibit. I really liked all of the other artists that were also featured in the exhibit because they tied in well with the overall feel and movement of the times. I really loved seeing Salvador Dali's work because it is one of my favorite pieces and I liked how his surrealism tied in with cubism. Thank you.

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TheSeraph - 4.1.2010 - 1:57 PM
I like the paintings with the bright colors and i enjoyed the sculptures as well! :)

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924am - 4.1.2010 - 1:56 PM
The nudes are me favorite because of the lines, not necessarily their nakedness.

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Caryatid5 - 4.1.2010 - 1:54 PM
The nudes are me favorite

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Caryatid5 - 4.1.2010 - 1:53 PM
the museum was beautiful, but the security was very rude...

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Liza - 4.1.2010 - 1:41 PM
Michael Part 2: Who really knew who (who really knew whose work)? What happened to Braque and Gris after their collaboration with Picasso in 1912 and Braque's wartime experience? Why did Picasso diminish Gris' contributions only to change his views before Gris' early death? Can Picasso's lifetime work really be shoehorned into any "ism" (besides perhaps, cubism)? Should it? Why do we remember Picasso and not Braque, Gris, Orloff, others? My own view is that the exhibit title is misleading, setting expectations too high. If the exhibit were billed as "Paris 1900-1950: Selections from the Permanent Collection" it would signal more modest ambitions, and I would have fewer criticisms. Happy to discuss: member

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Michael - 4.1.2010 - 1:36 PM
Michael Part 1: By trying to do too much this exhibition did too little, forcing many themes into its premise ("Picasso and the avant-garde") and losing control in the process. Its investment in Picasso in the first two galleries was redundant (hardly new, duplicated the work available in many museums) and it might have been better devoted to Picasso's contemporaries. Their work receives often quick display in subsequent galleries but is under-interpreted. Overall the exhibit raises many basic questions it never answers.

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Michael - 4.1.2010 - 1:35 PM
Dear Picasso,I think you are really cool.I like your paintings a lot.I liked the painting of the woman.I think you are really good at art.I'm sad that you are dead.

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Chris - 4.1.2010 - 1:29 PM
The evolutionary sequence of the the paintings of Picasso and his contemporaries depicts the major scientific, psychological and artistic paradigm shifts throughout their times. Exquisite exhibit and display of this change in trends.

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Leah and Emunah - 4.1.2010 - 1:24 PM
it was amazing i loved the drawings of the minoutars, i liked the painting of salvador dali

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gedaliah ber moshe meadvin - 4.1.2010 - 1:20 PM
I LIKED THE NON CUBISM ART THE BEST

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DANIEL - 4.1.2010 - 1:19 PM
I LIKED THE EXHIBIT.THE FAMILY GUIDE IS EXCELLENT. A GENUINE TREAT!

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GRAHAM, NANA, AND OPA VOELLINGER - 4.1.2010 - 1:13 PM
A wonderful way to spend a thursday out of school. I especially liked earl horter's nude and jacques villon's young girl. The museum is very fortunate to have access to all these works. I am very fortunate to have friends to share the day with.

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Phil - 4.1.2010 - 1:08 PM
Brancusi's sculpture's are arrestingly simple. Seeing the subject's self-portrait, for the Hungarian woman, was enlightening and moving.

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Brice C - 4.1.2010 - 12:43 PM
I loved the gift shop and the round couch. It was very comfy and soft!!!!!!

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Zuweemama - 4.1.2010 - 12:29 PM
I found the Picasso exhibit very educational and interesting. I like the combination of many artists so as to see other comparisons.

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Diana - 4.1.2010 - 12:27 PM
The sculpture, Prayer, by Lipchitz, is described in the audio tour as wearing a hood. Since the artist was Jewish, I believe the figue is a Kohanim or priest and he is wearing a large tallit, or prayer shawl. The tallit is worn during prayer.






Web Comment
Susan Portnoff - 4.1.2010 - 12:11 PM