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Visiting an exhibition in person is a much richer experience than visiting online.

The general public saw Cubist artworks for the first time at that annual exhibition in Paris, what are your reactions to these paintings and sculpture nearly a century later? What was your favorite gallery in the exhibition and why? Which works of art impressed you the most and the least?

It was incredible and amazing. I loved the works by all the painters. The curators were extremely nice and they helped me appreciate all the works. Next time, there should be some sort of drinks and appetizers. In my next life I want to be as famous as Picasso.

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Anonymous - 2.27.2010 - 3:11 PM
I was struck by the fact that art cannot exist in a vacuum. Rather it must be appreciated against a background of history. I enjoyed the exhibit very much, and I was most appreciative of the audio tour.

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Carol - 2.27.2010 - 2:49 PM
Greatly impressed with the depth and breadth of your collection. Illustrating the proverb of "tis an ill wind," the current economic climate is forcing museums to dig into their collections for shows instead of relying on visiting blockbusters. The results can be terrific, as in this case. I particularly enjoyed the recreation of "Cubism lite" in the room that echoes the Salon of Autumn.Great job.

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Margarita L - 2.27.2010 - 2:03 PM
well done.

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amw - 2.27.2010 - 1:56 PM
This is one of my favorite exhibits. I did hear that The Three Musicians on exhibit is one of 2 created by Picasso. Thanks for a wonderful day.

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MAG - 2.27.2010 - 1:35 PM
Picasso and his work, along with the efforts of the many artists he inspired during his work in Paris, have become so ingrained into the contemporary creative consciousness as to become almost trite. The styles and linework, the use of color - or "not color", found its way into cartoons of the late 60's and early 70's. It became the wallpaper backdrop for the butt of so many jokes on living the "artistic life."This exhibition is to be commended for attempting to bring the viewer back in time, to set a clear - if not brief - context for the efforts of visionaries. We need a new Breton. We need a new Picasso.It's also good to recall one of Pablo's quotes: "Those who attempt to explain art – are almost always wrong."

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SLowe - 2.27.2010 - 1:09 PM
I teach Spanish in High School and in the curriculum there is a unit about the work of Spanish artists. This was a treat for me. Having visited Spain, I have seen quite bit of Dali's and Picasso's work. I think that this was a fantastic exhibition. I was particularly intrigued by the work of Juan Gris. What a pity he died so young. Me gusta la exhibicion y felicidades.

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Elaine (New York resident) - 2.27.2010 - 12:51 PM
enjoyed the exhibit very much, commentaries via headphones very helpful, esp. to the uninitiated viewer such as myself. i've begun to explore the world of quilting, preferring to make them up as i go along, rather than follow traditional patterns. the aspects of cubism resonates with me. . .could i make up such work using fabrics????!!! there is one technique where the fabric is pieced together in gradual amounts of lights to darks, but i forget the name of that technique. fun thinking!

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dottie - 2.27.2010 - 12:32 PM
Fascinating exhibit. I am not a lover of modern art though my daughter states there is beauty in the works. After strolling through this exhibit I have a better understanding of Picasso and how the art evolved. Human history is a fascinating element to expressing one's thoughts and views.snickers411

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snickers411 - 2.27.2010 - 12:26 PM
My husband Craig and I came here along with three other friends. I absolutely loved the exhibit. This exhibit opened my eyes to Picasso and his work. I gained a greater appreciation of him. I have to say I was moved by the sculpture Man with a Lamb. Simply beautyiful

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Barbara Gallagher - 2.27.2010 - 11:55 AM
I was unaware how many artists were painting in the Cubist style during the time that Picasso was alive. Jean Gris work is so much more finished and detailed. I enjoyed his work much more than Picasso's whose work seems immature and unfinished in comparison. It has encouraged me to pursue more research on an artist previously unknown to me.

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Michelle - 2.27.2010 - 11:44 AM
i likeed this exhibit but not as much as ceyzon.im not a fan of picaso or cubisim so this particular exhibit didnt intrest me as much as others.

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megan - 2.27.2010 - 11:19 AM
As a friend of the recently deceased surrealist Polish painter and sculpture Helena Kaminska Anneski (b. 1920-d. 2003), of Warsaw and Haddonfield, NJ, I would like to say thank-you for including so many Eastern Europeans in your Picasso Exhibition. In later years Helena would regularly come with me to the Philadelphia Art Museum and we would walk the Modern Art Gallery. Looking at the museums paintings and sculpture she would regale me with many first hand accounts of the painters she knew from the period. She had visited pre-war Paris in the summers to study dance and painting. As an example, she had watched Bonnard sneak into the Louvre to over paint his most recent work hanging on the walls, get caught, and get expelled.

Eventually she would tire of standing and inevitability say: Where are the paintings of Eastern Europeans; the Poles, the Russians, Czecks, Ukrainians, Bulgarians? Do they think the only surrealists or cubists painting at that time were East of Paris? Where is Kandinsky and ....and .....and ...and....?

Well, you would have made her day because many, many of the names she spoke of are not only displayed, but an entire room is set aside for them. In conclusion, I called her family in Warsaw immediately after seeing the exhibit and told them about the "balance of the exhibit" and they thank you.

Web Comment
David Marshall - 2.27.2010 - 10:50 AM
I believe this was very incredible artwork. I especially love the brightly colored, enthusiastically drawn, beautiful cubism. This was just phenomenal!!!

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Mary Sue Ellen - 2.27.2010 - 10:46 AM
I had a wonderful time viewing the exhibit. It put on smile on my face :) I was introduced to Cubism over a year ago by a college professor. Since then I can't stop researching and learning about the movement. I thought the exhibit, combined with the audio tour provided me with new insight and exposed me to other artists.

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Matthew Stawecki - 2.27.2010 - 12:48 AM
We were in town for one night to visit our son, but because of the snow we extended our visit to include the wonderful exhibit of Picasso and other Cubist artists. I enjoyed the exhibit, and because of the weather, we were fortunate not to have many people in the galleries. We were able to take our time and enjoy each piece. It was however, much bigger than we expected, and towards the end, it somewhat lost focus as it wound its way towards Chagall and Dali. Loved the historical perspective, very meaningful. Now that we have lived in the South for 7 yrs, we miss the treasures that well established museums offer!

Web Comment
Debra Neisler - 2.27.2010 - 12:12 AM
Enjoyed very much -- so many treasures -- audio program very well done, and interesting!

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Geo - 2.26.2010 - 9:00 PM
I enjoyed seeing Picasso's work in the context of his time and friends. It is interesting to see who collected his early works. While this was not a huge selection of Picasso's incredible output, it did give a strong sense of the influences he had on other artists, even before he became well known.

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paula - 2.26.2010 - 8:30 PM
I felt it left out some of his best late career masterpieces. They left out so much of his personal biography which gives an amazing backdrop to why he created what he did

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AMclaughlin - 2.26.2010 - 7:44 PM
This was one of my favorite exhibits! I loved the depth, and the way in which it described what was going on in the world at the time the artists were painting.Also, all of the work shown is owned by the Philadelphia Museum of Art!

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Pat Carney-Dalton - 2.26.2010 - 6:09 PM